Anti-Immigrant Bill Would Keep Victims Silent


Arizona-Copycat Legislation Introduced.  Make Your Voice Heard.

As we were anticipating, Representative Don Pridemore has introduced his anti-immigrant bill, which is modeled after Arizona Senate Bill 1070.  The bill will require law enforcement officers to verify the immigration status of any individual charged with a crime or civil violation (i.e. speeding) who the officer has “reasonable suspicion” to believe is not lawfully present in the country. This will be an open invitation to legally-encouraged racial profiling.  Anyone who cannot provide proof of his or her status would be turned over to immigration authorities.

This bill will make our communities more dangerous.

If enacted, this bill will create entire segments of the population that are fearful of the police.  Immigrant victims will be even less likely to report abuse to law enforcement, and dangerous abusers and sex offenders will go unidentified.

This bill will be used by abusers to silence victims.

Even now, abusers take advantage of the climate of fear surrounding immigration and tell immigrant victims that they and their children will be deported if they report the abuse. The Arizona-Copycat bill would give more credence to these threats, and abusers will more easily keep victims trapped.

This is bill ignores federal immigration rights for victims of crime.

Under federal law, immigrant victims who cooperate with law enforcement are eligible for legal status.  The Arizona-Copycat bill would create a blunt enforcement mechanism that ignores the fact that many immigrant victims may be legally entitled to a documented immigration status.

Act Now to Oppose this Bill

Click here to sign a petition in opposition and forward it to friends and family. 

Haga clic aquí para la petición en español.

Also, call or email your state legislators. Once you sign the petition, you will find a template letter. 

 

Broken Trust from Enlace Comunitario on Vimeo.

Talking points:

  • LRB 1116 would increase the climate of fear that prevents immigrant victims of domestic violence from coming forward to report abuse and receive help. 
  • LRB 1116 would give abusers increased power to isolate and control victims.  Abusers who are citizens or permanent residents often tell immigrant victims that they and their children will be deported if the victim reports the abuse to law enforcement.  LRB 1116 increases the likelihood that abusers’ threats will be effective and that victims and their children will suffer in silence.
  • LRB 1116 would discourage immigrant victims from interacting with law enforcement.  We are all at risk when violent abusers go unidentified. Creating an entire class of community members that is fearful of the police is not only unjust; it makes the whole community unsafe.
  • LRB 1116 would undermine federal immigration protections for victims of domestic violence. Under federal law, immigrant victims who cooperate with law enforcement are eligible for legal status.  LRB 1116 would create a blunt enforcement mechanism that ignores the fact that many immigrant victims may be legally entitled to a documented immigration status.