Outreach to Underserved Communities

End Domestic Abuse Wisconsin (WCADV) has a more than 15 year history of supporting communities of color and underserved communities in determining best practices for their own communities, to ensure the safety of all domestic violence victims and their children and to improve perpetrator accountability. We work to improve responsiveness of domestic violence service providers, health and legal systems, the faith community and advocacy organizations to the needs of people of color and other underserved communities. Our activities and efforts with or on behalf of communities of color and all battered women are determined by and led by battered and formerly battered women and their respective communities of color. These efforts are primarily women-led and involve grassroots and community-based groups.

In 2010, we implemented the Connected Cultures Leadership and Skill-Building Institute (CCLI). CCLI promotes the leadership of 20 domestic violence survivors and/or advocates from underserved groups by providing a year-long learning environment.  CCLI participants learn and exchange ideas about multi-cultural organizations, human resources, budgeting, grant writing, legislative advocacy, communication and conflict resolution, and community organizing. 

Also in 2010, with funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), WCADV was able to create outreach specifically to support Hmong and Southeast Asian Refugee Family Strengthening programs. 

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Selected Resources

Diversity, Multiculturalism & Anti-Oppression - a manual for domestic abuse programs in Wisconsin

Created by the Access Committee of the Governor's Council, this Anti-Oppression Manual was created to help explore ways in which an anti-oppression framework can be applied to our work on a daily basis to end domestic violence.

Coalition Chronicles 29-4: Connected Cultures

December 2010 Issue: Through WCADV's Connected Cultures Leadership Institute (CCLI), we engaged in a year-long educational process with survivors of violence and/or women from communities of color. Many of the 2010 CCLI graduates contributed to this issue of the WCADV Coalition Chronicles.

Coalition Chronicles 28-3: Racism

December 2009 Issue: At its core, domestic violence is a form of oppression. Victims of color, immigrant and/or refugee victims often also face the oppression of racism, causing greater barriers and intersecting layers of abuse. As a movement, we are challenged to examine the ways that our own individual and institutional racism contribute to disparate services for victims of color.